Research proposal journal digital curriculum

On the Development of a Digital Forensics Curriculum

van merrienboer and brand-gruwel (2005) argue in a similar way when claiming that the added pedagogical value of digital technologies lies in new ways of organizing and changing learning tasks and learning contents. ola lindberg, göran fransson og trond eiliv haugeside: 207-225sammendragengelsk sammendragthis article is a review of international research on the uptake and use of digital technologies in primary and secondary schools. the fourth and last theme identified in the literature review, “uptake and use of digital technologies in relation to students”, it is interesting to note that ses is a theme that warrants further investigation. sang, valcke, van braak and tondeur (2010) argue that successful use of digital technology is related to the thinking processes of classroom teachers, such as teachers’ beliefs in, teachers’ efficacies and teachers’ attitudes towards digital technology. they emphasize that the integration of digital technologies in schools should not only include exciting practices and regulating policies, but also the processes that teachers are part of when learning to master the digital technologies for teaching purposes. in a sense, it may be possible to conceptualize “use” as “ongoing use”, whilst “uptake” could highlight the processes of implementation and integration of new aspects of digital technologies and how they are made use of. we decided that one way of upholding the scientific quality of the article was to include only scientific journals with peer-reviewed articles. here, research that is sensitive to the rapid development of digital technologies would be valuable. show that teachers are mostly concerned with the development of their own technical skills, but that the digital technology curriculum emphasizes the integrated use of digital technology in the learning and teaching process. for example, the students used digital technologies for solving tasks outside school and developed plans related to digital technologies in their further education and future profession. although such studies may not generate results that apply to all schools in all countries or in a greater context, such as the european union, this research could provide results that pave the way for developmental discussions about the uptake and use of digital technologies in primary and secondary schools. researchers show that the uptake and use of digital technologies is possible without the “push” from policy levels. the potential value of a school-based curriculum for digital technologies is suggested – a curriculum that converts the national curriculum related to digital technologies into an agenda for digital technologies as part of the overall school policy. consequently, we employ “uptake and use” as a phrase that simultaneously addresses both aspects of digital technologies: something “in use” and something about “to be used” in perhaps new and changing contexts. in relation to their empirical study, ward & parr (2010) discuss the possibility of reframing the question of digital technology. uptake and use of digital technologies in relation to school organization and school leadershipthe next theme identified in this review concerns research on the uptake and use of digital technologies in relation to school organization and school leadership. wong, li, choi and lee (2008) claim that in research on the integration of digital technologies there is a need for more comparative case studies with an understanding of the processes of change in educational systems as their primary focus. some of the research studies reported can be characterized as complex, while others adopt a more critical approach and some take a more normative stance when presenting models for the successful uptake and use of digital technologies. the logic behind the searches was to find articles about the uptake and use of digital technologies in primary and secondary schools. claim that a fourth stage in the digital divide is necessary – one that concerns the support that is available for the uptake of digital technology in schools.

Futurelab

is yet to be learned concerning effective ways to incorporate digital ecms into effective pd environments. digital ecms in this study were refined through multiple field tests with in-service teachers (callahan et al. three specific suggestions for research on the uptake and use of digital technologies in primary and secondary school are provided: (1) the outcomes of technology use in relation to different levels in the educational system, e.  as curriculum coach, kate was a designated mentor for the department; however, she was not an expert in social studies pedagogy. another point is that the use of digital technologies in different informal contexts creates an even larger divide between the digital culture of the youth and the institutional culture that often exists in school. sipilä (2010), on the other hand, claims that the uptake of digital technologies in school is a process that is mediated by teacher characteristics, technological framework and the conditions within the school. according to sipilä’s findings, based on quantitative data collected by the use of an online questionnaire, providing teachers with laptops can be a way of enhancing the teachers’ use of digital technologies both at work and in their spare time.  moreover, pd tends to be ineffective even when founded upon widely recognized best practices: a strong content focus, inquiry based, and consistency with a school system’s curriculum and policies (desimone, 2009; hiebert & morris, 2012; hill, beisiegel, & jacob, 2013; penuel, fishman, yamaguchi, & gallagher, 2007). the second theme, “uptake and use of digital technologies in relation to school organization and school leadership”, seems to be problematic in relation to the readiness of primary and secondary schools to implement and take advantage of the technologies in everyday practice. this article contributes to the understanding of this information gap by focusing on research on the uptake and use of digital technologies in primary and secondary schools.  the qualitative, design-based research experiment asked, “can sustained, collaborative professional development experiences with digital educative curriculum materials help in-service social studies teachers develop professional teaching knowledge? in this article, we argue that we need to unpack the discrepancy between the overall policy, the hope for change in school that is driven by digital technologies and the real state of technology use in teaching and learning. they argue that teachers who understand the use of digital technologies and the subsequent benefits to teaching and learning are probably more willing to learn, try new things and move away from more traditional classroom practices (see also herrington, herrington, hoban, and reid, 2009; haydn & barton, 2008). here only content characteristics were deemed to be important, and no other considerations, such as nationality, discipline, journal or the sex of the authors, were taken into account. digital tools and challenges to institutional traditions of learning: technologies, social memory and the performative nature of learning. they ask the following rhetorical questions: is it improvements in traditional processes and knowledge that might emerge from the use of digital technologies, or are practitioners looking for new reasoning and new knowledge? digital technologies embrace several terms, such as computers, information- and communication technology (ict), learning management systems (lms) and digital media like, for example, wikis, blogs, social media and podcasts (davies & merchant, 2009). for stakeholders such as industry, there is an interest in creating and upholding the picture of potential benefits with digital technologies in schools, even though such benefits may not always exist. their data was collected by means of a survey study focusing on the relation between teacher trainees’ thinking processes and the potential level of uptake of digital technologies in chinese schools. even so, it is declared that higher learning outcomes from the use of digital technologies are expected, but that the potential advantage of digital technologies in schools has not yet been fulfilled.

Rguhs guidelines for dissertation

Uptake and Use of Digital Technologies in Primary and Secondary

depart from a more technology-driven argument when suggesting that it is important for teachers and policy-makers not to treat new digital technologies as unproblematic innovations that will somehow lead to enhanced learning and “replace” older and existing technologies.  participants experienced another pbhi activity (identical to the one described for phase 1) centered around a fourth historical photograph; then they explored a fourth set of digital ecms. however, according to säljö (2010), research results reported in relation to the uptake and use of digital technologies in schools are not always clear and seldom indicate success (e. in her argumentative article, lin (2008) focuses on digital technologies as a subject in itself. o’bannon and judge (2004) argue from a multi-method study that even if schools invest in new digital technologies, their use in the classroom is rather limited. point to the responsibility of the student teacher him- or herself when it comes to understanding and using digital technologies in teaching. show how the uptake of digital technologies is positively related to a school profile reflecting higher levels of both structural and cultural school characteristics. 380) and erstad (2011) stresses the importance of applying a holistic perspective in relation to the role of digital technologies in educational activities when trying to understand processes of change and development in schools.., historical photographs) because contemporary physical and digital environments are filled with images through which people tend to make sense of the world (burns 2006; callahan, 2013a, 2015; callow 2006; säljö, 2010). (2006) takes on a slightly different approach in her longitudinal case study of the uptake of digital technologies in government schools in australia.  curriculum designers who seek to establish a participatory relationship between teachers and their digital curricula might consider that fewer hyperlinks should increase teachers’ engagement: fewer stimuli may allow for focused attention and minimize cognitive overload (see callahan et al., this indicates a gap between the proposed and the implemented curriculum for digital technologies. another example is haydn and barton (2008), who report on a descriptive study of teacher professional development related to the use of digital technologies in subject teaching. lin argues that one might not expect students to learn automatically just by taking part in activities with digital technologies. in addition, future studies should have a more precise focus on the uptake and use of digital technologies, and/or adopt a holistic approach that encompasses structural as well as cultural aspects.  some have further asserted that digital technology is likely to serve as the foundation for future pd efforts for in-service and preservice teachers (hicks, lee, berson, bolick, & diem, 2014). a study by tondeur, devos, van houtte, van braak and valcke (2009) highlights the complexity of the uptake of digital technologies in primary schools. leading schools in the digital age: a clash of cultures. these researchers emphasize the importance of teachers being assisted in their uptake and use of digital technologies. jerome spent several minutes revisiting the digital ecms and read aloud a persistent societal concern presented in the materials.

A Study on Exploiting Commercial Digital Games into School Context

Supporting In-Service Teachers' Professional Teaching Knowledge

  teachers explored digital ecms collaboratively in a pd context and interacted with digital ecms in preparation to plan and implement an original activity. the researchers maintain that this could be a sign that by starting to focus on the implementation of support structures, low ses schools in florida position themselves as schools that improve the uptake of digital technologies. employed think aloud protocols (ericsson & simon, 1998; jaaskelainen, 2010) during the teachers’ interactions with digital ecms and throughout the collaborations to gain insight into participants’ thoughts and rationale for their decisions. an agreement seems to exist that teachers are playing a crucial role in the process of uptake and use of digital technologies and in the development of new practices pervaded by digital technologies. in addition, some of the research studies in this theme report on how to come to terms with inequalities concerning students’ use of digital technologies, in a short-term, long-term and life-long perspective. and philip thought that connecting content information to students’ lives was “common knowledge,” and seemed dismissive of the digital ecms.  however, findings suggested that sustained, collaborative experiences with digital educative curricula helped teachers in this study begin to articulate and demonstrate tenets of problem-based historical inquiry (e. technology integration centered around engaging teachers in prolonged collaborative experiences with digital educative curricula. the following terms and combinations were used: digital technologies or ict or computers, teaching or learning or k-12 and implementation or uptake or use and school culture or school organization. she concludes by saying that it is unreasonable to expect that teachers who use digital technologies in their own subject areas should also be held responsible for teaching digital technologies generally. and use of digital technologies in relation to teachers and teachers’ professional development the third identified theme concerns research on teachers, teachers’ professional development and teacher education in relation to the uptake and use of digital technologies in schools. in use – some lessons about change in schools and teacher professional development2/6technology in use – some lessons about change in schools and teacher professional developmentstudent teachers learning to teach: the mastery and appropriation of digital technology. schibeci, maccallum, cumming-potvin, durrant, kissane and miller (2008) conclude in a qualitative study that teachers’ learning experiences with digital technologies are facilitated and empowered through long-term collaboration with colleagues and students over time. curriculum materials as a professional development tool: how a mathematics textbook affected two teachers’ learning. she poses questions such as how are students supposed to acquire digital technology knowledge and skills and who is supposed to teach such knowledge and skills to the students? in an attempt to extend the search even further, it was decided to use the following terms and combinations: digital technologies or ict or computers and teaching or learning or k-12 and implementation or uptake or use. another example is the theoretical and statistical study carried out by hohlfeld, ritzhaupt, barron and kemker (2008), which focused on the digital divide in an american context (florida). mcgarr (2009) argues that there is still a lack of research on the subject to show convincingly that the uptake and use of digital technologies in school practices actually changes the organization and the educational theories used to inform teaching and learning. for example, based on a case study of a particular school, loveless (2007) argues that a framework of teacher professional knowledge that highlights the relations between subject domain knowledge, the didactic relation with digital technologies and various teaching situations can support teaching with digital technologies. he argues that the high use of digital technologies creates a gap between a digitally supported youth culture and the more institutional culture of schools.

Samuel stanhope smith essay

Undergraduate Journals | Undergraduate Journals | Council on

in this context, one emergent focus is the discrepancies between the conceptions and ideas of what it is possible to achieve with digital technology in schools. this seems to complicate the matter of the uptake and use of digital technologies in different ways, especially when the arenas are confused. they state that current research is rather limited when it comes to the impact of digital technologies in education and the effect these technologies have on students’ academic performances. before starting any development work, teachers and leaders should ask themselves what kind of improvements they really want or need and how digital technologies might support them.  the teachers then revisited their earlier work with digital ecms and synthesized their discussions of pbhi tenets.  others define educative curriculum materials (ecms) broadly as teaching resources intended for student and teacher learning (collopy, 2003; davis & krajcik, 2005; drake, land, & tyminski, 2014). different universities subscribe to different databases and sources, which means that if two universities subscribe to different journals this may also result in different outcomes when searching reference databases like eric and academic search elite. this often seems to be the case regardless of the scientific discipline of the researchers and is probably due to the fact that these two concepts capture a variety of practices, dimensions and levels related to digital technologies in schools.  the authors proposed three features to strengthen future teacher-support efforts: dynamic experiences modeling wise practices, digital curriculum designed for collaboration, and expert mentors to help facilitate learning. she concludes that a culture of collaboration and collective efforts, with frequent reassessments of ways of working, will help the school as an organization to remain open and receptive to opportunities for change in relation to the uptake and use of digital technologies. using educative curriculum materials to support the development of prospective teachers’ knowledge. for instance, in his literature review on digital technologies in irish post primary/secondary schools, mcgarr (2009) focuses on how the education system received different initiatives related to digital technologies and policy changes. for example, in their questionnaire study, hermans, tondeur, van braak and valcke (2008) give empirical evidence for claiming that teacher beliefs about the practice of teaching are important in explaining why teachers adopt digital technologies in the classroom. a sequence of screen shots that illustrate the digital ecms’ interface design.  he suggested participants might further develop their craft in ways consistent with the pbhi experience by engaging digital ecms and discussing them with colleagues. such an approach could help to address the complexities of the interactions between policy, strategic leadership, teachers and students, and probe more deeply into how the use of digital technologies can be understood in terms of the learning and teaching they enhance in primary and secondary schools.  however, teachers’ collaborative participation and created activities offered promising evidence that sustained collaborative experiences with digital ecms can help teachers begin to recognize, value, and practice tenets of a wise-practice pedagogy. we conclude this fourth and final theme by pointing out that the use and flow of digital technologies across and between school, home and other spaces seems to need further research. reviewthe four different themes that we identified on the uptake and use of digital technologies in primary and secondary schools were: (1) uptake and use of digital technologies in schools in relation to policy, (2) uptake and use of digital technologies in schools in relation to school organization and school leadership, (3) uptake and use of digital technologies in schools in relation to teachers and teachers’ professional development, and (4) uptake and use of digital technologies in schools in relation to students. scaffolding student research in a digital age: an invitation to inquiry, networks, 11(1), 1–11.

Staffing requirements business plan

ERIC - Journals List

based on interviews with teachers from six different subject areas, john (2005) shows how other factors, such as the brief, evolving and incomplete nature of the relationship between a subject’s sub-cultures and digital technologies, create problems in teaching.  a promising strategy for improving instructional practices and student outcomes is for teachers and researchers to work together in creating, using, and revising curriculum resources (hiebert & morris, 2012; morris & hiebert, 2011). and use of digital technologies in schools in relation to studentsthe fourth and final identified theme comprises research that is particularly aimed at students’ uptake and use of digital technologies in school. for example, dwyer (2007) reports from a multi-case study using interview and observation data that aspects such as digital technology resources and the time available for their use, combined with type of use, work against the valuing of digital technologies in the early years of primary school. negotiating digital literacy practices across school and home: case studies of young people in australia. software is often connected to the use of digital technologies too (e. uptake and use of digital technologies in schools in relation to policy the first identified theme concerns different aspects of the uptake and use of digital technologies in schools as related to policy. investigated whether sustained, collaborative pd experiences with digital educative curriculum materials could promote secondary social studies teachers’ ptk. for example, building on data collected from semi-structured and focus group interviews, mcgarr and kearney (2009) examine the effect of digital technology on the leadership role of a group of school leaders. according to tondeur, devos, van houtte, van braak and valcke (2009), the possibility of understanding the uptake and use of digital technologies in schools depends on the research design. the second conclusion is that research repeatedly reports disappointing results when it comes to how schools adapt and integrate new digital technologies. they claim that their focus on the multi-dimensional interaction of both teacher and school characteristics was helpful in developing a richer understanding of the complex process of the uptake of digital technologies.  i mean, these [digital ecms] are at least providing us ways to think about making class more interesting for students, and it can help with differentiating, too. examining the digital divide in k-12 public schools: four-year trends for supporting ict literacy in florida. when implementing digital technologies in teaching and learning there seems to be a need for schools and school leaders to identify which improvements they actually want to achieve and which tools and methods should be used. pdf-versjon skriv ut lagre referanse (ris)favoritt. in addition, the intensive use of digital technologies seems to have created both confidence with and a positive attitude towards digital technologies. they report frustration among the school leaders, many of whom felt unable to achieve the level of digital technology use they expected in their schools. like bulfin and north (2007), ilomäki and rantanen included students’ use of digital technologies at school and at home. the outcomes are far from straightforward when digital technologies are introduced either in general or in specific subjects or contexts of learning.

Curriculum Vitae | alli crandell

using educative curriculum materials to promote the development of professional teaching knowledge (unpublished doctoral dissertation).  our work may provide additional suggestions for investigations into the potential of interactive pd featuring digital ecms. an ethnographic case study approach in research into the digital literacy of young people in australia, bulfin and north (2007) report that young people's practices develop around their use of digital technologies that flows across and between school, home and other spaces, thus making simple distinctions and binaries about use in each domain problematic.  despite these limitations, our findings suggest a number of potential implications that might enhance the effectiveness of pd, especially when programs feature digital ecms in similar contexts. dwyer argues that compared with students in the later primary years, students in the early primary school years experience a reduced potential to benefit from learning with digital technologies in school. less focus may be needed on digital technologies in emerging learning and teaching practices, and more focus might be preferable on digital technologies as driving forces for this development. considerations we took a broad approach rather than relying on a small sample for the review, for instance from a few specialist international scientific peer-review journals decided beforehand.  we only introduced the notion of educative curricula, provided digital ecms, and encouraged teachers to work together to make sense of the reform ideas. research represented in this theme is also slightly more normative with regard to proposals of models or frameworks for how to enhance the use of digital technology in schools.  the digital ecms lessons advocated students’ deliberation of multiple truth claims and discussion of values underpinning historical decisions; both teachers omitted these features. their results indicate that teacher beliefs are a strong predictor of classroom use, and that beliefs are of importance in relation to the resistance and receptiveness of school teachers to the use of digital technologies in their classroom practices (see also tondeur, hermans, van braak & valcke, 2008). the review includes teachers’ use of and beliefs about digital technology in relation to the subjects they teach and to their own professional development. education stakeholders have expressed the hope that digital technologies will substantially influence teaching and learning in primary and secondary schools. since the aim of this literature review was to provide a credible and clear picture of the current international research on the uptake and use of digital technologies in schools, we decided to describe the themes by using characteristic publications that exemplified the focus of each theme. a multilevel methodology approach could also produce new insights into the uptake and use of digital technologies in schools and in education, how technologies are constructed and how knowledge develops in the use. a critical question might also be asked, namely why should digital technologies be an obvious part of the school organization and the learning activities? inspired by säljö’s (2010) reasoning, in this third theme we conclude that the use of digital technologies in schools needs to be researched further in order to provide a deeper understanding of the learning and teaching they can enhance. in the articles analyzed here it is not easy, or even possible, to separate these two aspects of digital technologies and how they are used in educational contexts. “uptake” and “use” are concepts that are often used in relation to digital technologies in primary and secondary schools and occur frequently in peer-review articles written in the empirical field. understanding of uptake and use from a nordic perspective, significant efforts have been made on the uptake and use of digital technologies in primary and secondary schools.

Digital Libraries - Wikiversity

also substantially modified the design of the digital ecms, reducing the number of educative links embedded in the materials. in his explorative and discussion-oriented article, williams (2008) emphasizes the role of school leaders at a time of rapid growth of digital technologies.  influence from the digital ecms was evident as josephine presented her students an open-ended question that presented a societal concern (i. teachers’ professional development is also in focus and is often related to the use of digital technologies in specific school subjects, as well as in relation to the initial teacher education for developing the pedagogical skills, ideas, visions and attitudes that favour the uptake and use of digital technologies in schools. and conclusionsthis article has focused on the uptake and use of digital technologies in primary and secondary schools. in terms of uptake and use, the final focus in this theme concerns how digital technologies differ in different age groups and school-stages. two strategies are used in this research review: (1) identify research themes that might reveal important lessons to be learned in relation to the uptake and use of digital technologies in primary and secondary schools, and (2) based on these lessons provide some suggestions for future research as to which knowledge-gaps still need to be closed. in the study, e-learning nordic 2006 (ramböll, 2006), it is indicated that digital technologies do have a positive effect on the change and improvement of the school organization and also on students’ learning.  participants, individually and on their own time, explored a second and third set of digital ecms. using results from an exploratory case study, including observation and interview data, they argue that student teachers who make very good use of ict also reflect on the contribution that digital technologies make. the review includes studies researching different digital technology tools and terms, such as filters for analyzing the problem of “uptake and use”.  then, we reread all data through the lens of our conceptual framework (pbhi) and looked for evidence to suggest that participants’ may have used the digital ecms to develop ptk. supporting in-service teachers’ professional teaching knowledge with educatively scaffolded digital curriculum.. state to find a secondary social studies department agreeable to a 13-month-long commitment to pd centered around planning and implementing lessons (a) designed collaboratively, (b) informed by digital educative curricula, and (c) featuring visual documents in a wise-practice, inquiry-based approach. accessuptake and use of digital technologies in primary and secondary schools – a thematic review of researchavanders d.  for example, we asked participants to respond not only to the digital ecms’ critical-thinking questions but also to their colleagues’ responses. keywords: digital technology, literature review, primary school, secondary school, uptake and use, policy, school leadership, teacher professional development. different aspects and issues concerning the uptake and use of digital technologies in primary and secondary schools are focused on, also at policy level. for instance, sutherland, armstrong, barnes, brawn, breeze, gall, matthewman, olivero, taylor, triggs, wishart and john (2004) make the point that the use of digital technologies further contributes to the complexity in schools and creates challenges and creative tensions between an out-of-school use of digital technologies and institutionalized knowledge, tasks and teaching methods. the procedure was then to read through the titles and abstracts of the 386 articles found, with a focus on articles that specifically embraced aspects of and were concerned with the uptake and use of digital technologies in primary and secondary schools.

On the Development of a Digital Forensics Curriculum

Assistant Professor of Marketing | Vitae

  we contacted curriculum directors, principals, and department chairs in a southeastern u. in addition, wong and li make a point with regard to the implications of improving school effectiveness and argue that in order to unleash the power of the uptake and use of digital technologies in school practitioners should first make clear what kind of improvements they are looking for. he argues that when the use of modern digital technology is not tied to a specific time or place, teachers will have more time to evaluate the possibilities provided by the technology, which in turn will probably increase the use of digital technologies in the classroom. in the light of this, we can only conclude that the institutional aspects of digital technologies in organizing and leading schools need to be re-addressed as a research field (cf. related to this finding is the work of ilomäki and rantanen (2007), who report from a longitudinal case study, containing both quantitative and qualitative data, on the development of students’ digital technology expertise in a technology intensive context. policy-makers and other stakeholders often push their ideas of what is good enough forward in opposition to what teachers experience as a certain minimum competence for using digital technologies. two strategies were used: (1) identify themes within current research that indicate important lessons to be learned in relation to the uptake and use of digital technologies in primary and secondary schools, and (2) based on these lessons, identify which knowledge-gaps need to be closed and in the light of this suggest directions for further research. teachers are seen as key players for the uptake and use of digital technology, and aspects like teachers’ motives, beliefs, confidence and competence are highlighted. in their large-scale survey they show that a significant number of the cohort had not undertaken any activities in relation to the use of digital technology in teaching mathematics. argue that the digital divide is usually described in three stages: (1) that students must have access to digital technologies in order to develop the necessary computer skills that enable them to acquire knowledge to create products and make decisions, (2) that students are able to use computers independently, and (3) that students improve aspects such as their intellectual, economic and cultural conditions. it is concluded that a rather complex and fragmented picture of the uptake and use of digital technologies emerges from the literature review. teachers averaged 66 minutes exploring digital ecms, and of that time they devoted an average of 26 minutes (39%) to discussing educative features. yet another focus of this theme is the relation between teacher education and the uptake and use of digital technologies. the terms school culture and school organization were excluded this time, given that the uptake and use of digital technologies could be studied without relation to cultural or organizational issues.  the investigation reported in this paper, our third in this line of inquiry, builds on the implications from the previous two iterations of educative curricula in an effort to refine continuously the optimal design and use of digital ecms for promoting ptk. there seems to be a need to re-address the role of digital technologies within the school as an organization.  throughout our study we asked, “can sustained, collaborative professional development experiences with digital educative curriculum materials help in-service social studies teachers develop professional teaching knowledge? for example, in his research review, ferdig (2006) concludes that from a teacher perspective the most valuable aspect is that the uptake and use of digital technologies can motivate increased quality in teaching, rather than that the digital technology in itself embodies certain qualities that guarantee good teaching and learning outcomes. the development of ict across the curriculum in irish schools: a historical perspective.  as they began to plan, the teachers often revisited the digital ecm’s lesson they examined earlier.

  the significant modifications we made to the structural features of this, the third, generation of our digital ecms seemed to better promote a participatory teacher-curriculum relationship. this could also be understood from another point of view, namely that digital technologies increase the complexity in schools.”  kate reiterated, “let’s make this lesson more like this” [pointing to laptop’s screen displaying the digital ecms lesson]. similarly, when framing the uptake of digital technologies in a context of managing change in schools, and building on data collected from a large-scale questionnaire, wong and li (2008) report that perceived changes in student learning towards a constructivist paradigm were mediated through pedagogical and organizational interventions. although a growing body of research on digital technology use in education seems to confirm this experience (erstad & hauge, 2011), we still need to learn more about how digital technologies affect the education system and educational practices at different levels. for instance, oecd (2009) put forth that digital technologies have the potential to change education and teaching in schools, while the european commission (2008) claims that digital technologies can improve and change the core activities in educational settings. an emergent problem is the challenge of dealing with the complexity of the educational context: in research and when to implement digital technologies. the larger societal surrounding seems to have an impact on the uptake and use of digital technologies and indeed also frames the possibilities and patterns of their use in primary and secondary schools. one crucial issue is whether consensus can be reached on the uptake and use of digital technologies to such an extent that “good enough use” can be specifically defined. in addition, school leaders need to consider how to steer or support the uptake of digital technologies and to acknowledge that the social context and institutional culture in their school are vital to successful implementation. despite our inability to isolate key variables and analyze them individually, data suggested that sustained experiences with digital ecms helped participants begin to develop ptk for pbhi. teacher thinking about curriculum and instruction: a case study of a secondary social studies teacher. in the research, a discrepancy is sometimes implied between policy-makers, school and ambitions when it comes to digital technologies. third theme, “uptake and use of digital technologies in relation to teachers and teachers’ professional development”, is just as complex as the two previous themes. new technology and digital worlds: analyzing evidence of equity in access, use, and outcomes. participants also seemed to interpret structured differently from the digital ecm’s intent. through a survey of 570 teachers from 53 different primary schools, they examine the actual uses of digital technologies in line with the competencies outlined by the flemish government. supported by the responses to their questionnaires, vanderlinde and van braak (2010) call this the e-capacity of a school, understood as a school’s ability to create and optimize sustainable conditions at school and teacher levels in order to bring about effective change through digital technologies. they also argue that becoming familiar with digital technologies cannot be perceived as a linear process. they identify factors that obstruct the use of digital technologies in subject teaching, such as lack of time, difficulty in accessing enough computers for the students and the availability of data projectors in ordinary classrooms.

international journal of mathematical education in science and technology, 44(7), 972-983. digital tools and challenges to institutional traditions of learning: technologies, social memory and the performative nature of learning. further, there appears to be a need for continuing research into teacher beliefs regarding the uptake and use of digital technologies in classrooms and on teachers’ related professional development (cf.  well-designed digital technologies can support teaching and learning (manfra, 2014; swan & hofer, 2008) and help learners develop new meaning-making skills (säljö, 2010). according to mcgarr, there is still a lack of research that clearly shows that the uptake and use of digital technologies in school practices also changes the school structure and the theories used to enhance or facilitate teaching and learning.  each phase consisted of participants (a) as learners, experiencing an activity modeling pbhi; (b) in small groups, exploring digital ecms; (c) collaboratively planning and implementing an activity informed by our pd program; and (d) together, debriefing each activity’s implementation. sixth member of the social studies department was the curriculum coach, kate. according to the results of the study it seems as though a process-oriented learning environment and an intensive use of digital technologies supported the development of student expertise. they present a model claimed to be effective for improving teachers’ digital technology skills and their ability to integrate and use digital technology in practice. article advances a continuing line of inquiry into the potential of digital educative curriculum materials to support teachers’ development of professional teaching knowledge.  the participants’ then explored a set of digital ecms, and callahan facilitated a discussion of its four educative features. the first theme, “uptake and use of digital technologies in relation to policy”, seems to represent a struggle or discrepancy between the focus and ambition expressed at policy level and actual practices in schools. educative curriculum materials to develop social studies teachers’ professional teaching knowledge. the relation between digital technologies and how they are used in different school subjects is another prominent focus of research on this theme.. arenas of implementation and realization, (2) digital practices that are longitudinal and information-rich and that go beyond existing knowledge, and (3) initiatives for a renewal of theoretical and methodological approaches when designing and analyzing studies within the field. an important conclusion drawn is that structural and cultural school characteristics are relevant for promoting educational change in general and the uptake of digital technologies in particular. the final focus in this theme concerns the challenging issue for school leaders to live up to, or deal with, expectations from the surrounding society in relation to the use of digital technologies in school. in view of this we decided to employ “uptake and use” as “a phrase to simultaneously address both aspects of digital technologies, something in use and something about to be used in perhaps new and changing contexts”. in their overview of us research on digital technologies, warschauer and matuchniak (2010) highlight the importance of embracing cultural conditions and, according to them, research into the uptake and use of digital technologies and change should preferably be related to socioeconomic status (ses), student diversity and cultural differences in school. if a collegial exchange of experiences using digital technologies in educational contexts is found to foster pedagogical innovations and improve school effectiveness, then policy-makers and school administrators should pay more attention to both the institutional culture and the social context.

Write a letter of reference for a teacher

Sitemap