Research proposal on intellectual property rights

IP Management in Horizon 2020: Proposal Stage | IPR Helpdesk

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Intellectual property rights

ownership of intellectual property by staff and students of the university is governed by the university’s intellectual property statute [pdf 191kb] and intellectual property policy. if ip is jointly owned, this will require the consent of the co-owner to exercise rights in that copyright work. it is important to consider the scope of project ip before agreeing to assign or licence any rights to it. property can involve know-how, inventions, results, copyright, patents, trademarks and software. research contracts should address the ownership of any intellectual property arising from the research project, to avoid uncertainty or disagreement. propertyintellectual property (ip) refers to a broad range of legal rights which can include:copyright – rights in literary, dramatic, artistic, musical works, films, broadcasts and sound recordings and performer’s rights (note ‘literary’ can include, for example, articles, reports, notes, books, software, databases)patent – right granted for a new, inventive and useful device, substance, method or processtrademarks – logo, nameregistered designs – unique look, shape, style of productscircuit layouts – computer chip or semi-conductor chip designsplant breeders rights – new varieties of plantsconfidential information – this may fall within intellectual property, depending on how it is defined in the contract. ownership of intellectual property by staff and students of the university is governed by the university’s intellectual property statute [pdf 191kb] and intellectual property policy.

Intellectual Property Considerations while preparing for a Research

the university may be required to warrant that the background ip does not infringe any other party’s rights. any background ip will be used or supplied for a research project, the university must check it has sufficient rights to use the ip for that purpose. university generally seeks to own intellectual property rights it creates, but the appropriate arrangement will depend on the circumstances and what is acceptable to the university and the researcher. propertyintellectual property (ip) refers to a broad range of legal rights which can include:copyright – rights in literary, dramatic, artistic, musical works, films, broadcasts and sound recordings and performer’s rights (note ‘literary’ can include, for example, articles, reports, notes, books, software, databases)patent – right granted for a new, inventive and useful device, substance, method or processtrademarks – logo, nameregistered designs – unique look, shape, style of productscircuit layouts – computer chip or semi-conductor chip designsplant breeders rights – new varieties of plantsconfidential information – this may fall within intellectual property, depending on how it is defined in the contract. and third party intellectual propertybackground ip will depend on how it is defined in the contract, but usually refers to intellectual property created prior to or independently of the project. in research projects involving external parties, the university may be required to grant ownership or licences of intellectual property to another party, which can affect the rights of staff and students. the university may be required to warrant that the background ip does not infringe any other party’s rights.

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party will need a licence to use intellectual property it does not own. a research contract, ip rights are generally categorised into project intellectual property, background intellectual property and third party intellectual property. the university may be required to warrant that the background ip does not infringe any other party’s rights. any background ip will be used or supplied for a research project, the university must check it has sufficient rights to use the ip for that purpose. it is important to consider the scope of project ip before agreeing to assign or licence any rights to it. and third party intellectual propertybackground ip will depend on how it is defined in the contract, but usually refers to intellectual property created prior to or independently of the project. intellectual propertydepending on how it is defined in the contract, project intellectual property usually refers to ip rights created in the course of or arising from the project.

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if any rights are to be granted to another party, the university should also ensure all proposed uses are acceptable. if an exclusive licence can be restricted, for example by territory or purpose, this should be considered to avoid unnecessary limitation of the university’s rights. and third party intellectual propertybackground ip will depend on how it is defined in the contract, but usually refers to intellectual property created prior to or independently of the project. a research contract, ip rights are generally categorised into project intellectual property, background intellectual property and third party intellectual property. in research projects involving external parties, the university may be required to grant ownership or licences of intellectual property to another party, which can affect the rights of staff and students. a research contract, ip rights are generally categorised into project intellectual property, background intellectual property and third party intellectual property. any background ip will be used or supplied for a research project, the university must check it has sufficient rights to use the ip for that purpose.

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