Stigma goffman book report

Revisiting Erving Goffman's Stigma: Notes on the Management of

basic distinction goffman makes towards understanding the literature on stigma (mostly qualitative) is that between virtual and social identity. goffman's account of the interplay between self-interpretation, social groups based on a common self-interpretation, and the truth that individuals "discover" in the process of joining these groups reminds me of foucault's last lectures ca. a bit too intellectual for me overall but quite academically and well written book about the concepts of stigma. drawing heavily from autobiographical and fictional accounts, this book really made me recognise a lot of social situations regarding the subject, both from the world of movies and novels, but also from everyday life. of writing is difficult to comprehend sometimes, but the book is very informative and worthwhile reading." goffman notes that the wise may in certain social situations also bear the stigma with respect to other normals: that is, they may also be stigmatized for being wise. drawing heavily from autobiographical and fictional accounts, this book really made me recognise a lot of social situations regarding the subject, both from the world of movies and novels, but also. actually i didn’t understand sections of this because i is a little bit dumb innit, but writing this has helped me understand the book better. the interaction positions (and not individuals or identities) that the stigmatized and the normal turn out to be by the end of stigma are subsumed within goffman's notion of frame. goffman discusses how one manages stigma, through their social, personal, and ego identities. see what your friends thought of this book,To ask other readers questions about. the interaction positions (and not individuals or identities) that the stigmatized and the normal turn out to be by the end of stigma are subsumed within goffman's notion of frame. sections covered in the book are stigma and social identity, information control, group alignment and ego identity and the self and its other and deviations from the norm. read this book while i was preparing a paper for a conference. that may have been the accepted style of academics in 1963 when this book was published, but i much prefer today’s style in which academics like steven levitt and clinicians like oliver sacks, m. by having people with stigma talking goffman seems to bring the definition of stigma into a daily basic understanding. goffman shies away from the term deviance somewhat, instead using stigma as a deeply discrediting feature in an individual that makes other “normal” people categorise the individual as such. goffman does explicitly explain that whilst he focuses on those with disabilities for the sake of ease of explanation of his theories, all people are stigmatised at some point in their life. goffman does explicitly explain that whilst he focuses on those with disabilities for the sake of ease of explanation of his theories, all people are stigmatised at some point in their life. stigma (1963), erving goffman discusses the effects of stigma, "the situation of the individual who is disqualified from full social inclusion" (preface), something that makes others believe they are "not quite human" (5). a bit of a 'classic', this book published in the us in 1963, makes many interesting observations about the nature of stigma. in this final chapter, goffman speaks of the tendency among the stigmatized to apply what i would call a substance metaphysics to their own conception of their identities. goffman shies away from the term deviance somewhat, instead using stigma as a deeply discrediting feature in an individual that makes other “normal” people categorise the individual as such. one of these speculations of mine pertains to the concept of "hipness," which seems in our society to depend on representing oneself as a true social deviant in goffman's sense, while nevertheless depending on certain "in-group outsider" identifications by others in order to consolidate the hip social role. goffman considered individuals whose stigmatizing attributes are not immediately evident.

Stigma: Notes on the Management of Spoiled Identity: Erving

a bit too intellectual for me overall but quite academically and well written book about the concepts of stigma. overall, i think goffman uses way too many words to explain his concepts, and the concepts themselves are poorly organized. actually i didn’t understand sections of this because i is a little bit dumb innit, but writing this has helped me understand the book better. nevertheless it covers a substantial range of the topic of stigma and explores the qualitative data collected by ervin goffman's extensive research. a further sense in which stigma is relational is that which goffman elaborates in his last chapter here. read this book because i'm starting a phd in sociology this fall and i'd read other goffman texts, and they had this book at borders, so i figured it was probably a big deal in sociology. the strategies invented or adopted by the stigmatized for achieving a coherent picture of their role in society, also known as worldviews or life-philosophies, are no more than worldviews according to goffman's account. helps you keep track of books you want to read. goffman, a noted sociologist, defined stigma as a special kind of gap between virtual social identity and actual social identity:Society establishes the means of categorizing persons and the complement of attributes felt to be ordinary and natural for members of each of these categories.”Stigma is an illuminating excursion into the situation of persons who are unable to conform to standards that society calls normal. the actual correspondence of the virtual identity one reads off of a person's bodily presence in a certain social context, to that person's larger social identity, is necessary to what goffman calls discrediting. it can also be a characteristic such as being homosexual – much more in goffman’s time or in russia or uganda today say. however, the thoughts and theories put forward in this book are some of the best i have read regarding the situation of somebody who is stigmatised in society compared to somebody who adopts a non-stigmatised position. goffman is writing on the very interesting subject of stigma, and while many of the points he makes are interesting and valid i was put off by his writing style and his frequent use of an 'us versus them' approach (for instance, he often referred to "we normals", which i found offensive). really, it is the sort of short book that should take an afternoon, well, or a life time. while i recognize that this book was written in the 1960s and that it was very progressive for the time, it still didn't do it for me. goffman breaks down the quotidian interactions between people who are trying to conceal, manage or control some aspect of their identity that discredits them. really, it is the sort of short book that should take an afternoon, well, or a life time. could not review this book as a sociologist and not mention the lack of gender equality in this book, but at the time it was written, the accepted mode of academic writing even within sociology was to refer to "he" when speaking of a person. book was terribly boring, but it had this one great example in it about how people treat someone when they just find out about their stigma. of course, it also might be successfully concealed; goffman called this passing. cross in their book entitled, being gifted in school, which is a widely cited reference in the field of gifted education. 2007 goffman was listed as the 6th most-cited intellectual in the humanities and social sciences by the times higher education guide, behind anthony giddens and ahead of jürgen habermas. this book makes an interesting contrast with andrew solomon's "far from the tree," which deals with the same topic--how society treats people who belong to marginalized and stigmatized groups--but solomon builds his arguments by piling on one unique anecdote after another in a beautiful mosaic, a book that celebrates individuality rather than erasing it. this is such a good book and such a quick read – it is only about 140 pages.

Stigma - Overview of the Concept & Book by Erving Goffman

Revisiting Erving Goffman's Stigma: Notes on the Management of

Social stigma - Wikipedia

see what your friends thought of this book,To ask other readers questions about. really, it could have fit in 1/4 of the pages he used, and it was a short book to begin with.% of them) would terminate an employment contract after an epileptic seizure occurred in an employee with unreported epilepsy. in frame analysis, he directly addresses the antifoundationalism that his pragmatic approach to sociology implies in books like earlier works like stigma and presentation of the self in everyday life.% of individuals with a mental illness, including conditions such as depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, and bipolar disorder, reported receiving treatment in 2011. conversation was centred on the reading of sociological books and the way in which each sociologist would have a different opinion, one loving a theorist and the other hating him thinking he was completely wrong. in frame analysis, he directly addresses the antifoundationalism that his pragmatic approach to sociology implies in books like earlier works like stigma and presentation of the self in everyday life. if you read modern texts on similar subjects, goffman is cited everywhere! goffman was also named the 73rd president of the american sociological association. conversation was centred on the reading of sociological books and the way in which each sociologist would have a different opinion, one loving a theorist and the other hating him thinking he was completely wrong. a bit of a 'classic', this book published in the us in 1963, makes many interesting observations about the nature of stigma. the thing is, i may have gotten the wrong book on stigma because the book was not nearly as interesting as her speech. goffman's account of the interplay between self-interpretation, social groups based on a common self-interpretation, and the truth that individuals "discover" in the process of joining these groups reminds me of foucault's last lectures ca. actually i didn’t understand sections of this because i is a little bit dumb innit, but writing this has helped me understand the book better.., frame analysis) it becomes clear that goffman's own descriptive project as outlined in the essay is entangled in the interest-bound attempt to discover the truth as any stigmatized individual seeking a coherent picture of herself and the world. this book, i'm reminded of being sat in the pub with three lecturers at my university when i was an undergraduate a year or two ago. to erving goffman there are three forms of social stigma:[3]. by marking “stigma: notes on the management of spoiled identity” as want to read:Error rating book. the dynamics of 'covering' a flaw, or trying to 'pass' as a 'normal' are explored and this fairly shortish book builds to quite a complete perspective upon the 'norms' of society and the way in-group and out-group stigmatised individuals exist in a kind of symbiosis (my word), with the ideals of identity - everyone alway existing at some point in both groups. at that point, one of the lecturers broke in, "apart from goffman. overall, i think goffman uses way too many words to explain his concepts, and the concepts themselves are poorly organized. was required to read this book for a graduate seminar on the metaphysics of social identities. this book, i'm reminded of being sat in the pub with three lecturers at my university when i was an undergraduate a year or two ago. reading stigma in 2009, with the benefit of having goffman's later work on hand (e. really, it is the sort of short book that should take an afternoon, well, or a life time.

Stigma: Notes on the Management of Spoiled Identity: Erving

CONCEPTUALIZING STIGMA Bruce G. Link1 and Jo C. Phelan2

unraveling the contexts of stigma, authors campbell and deacon describe goffman's universal and historical forms of stigma as the following. often incorrectly attributed to goffman the "six dimensions of stigma" were not his invention. reading stigma in 2009, with the benefit of having goffman's later work on hand (e. extensively on autobiographies and case studies, sociologist erving goffman analyzes the stigmatized person’s feelings about himself and his relationship to “normals” he explores the variety of strategies stigmatized individuals employ to deal with the rejection of others, and the complex sorts of information about themselves they project. was also interested to see a reference to the book the little locksmith, which had recently been recommended. goffman is more cited today from his books than during his time. actually i didn’t understand sections of this because i is a little bit dumb innit, but writing this has helped me understand the book better. having said that, i’m still curious about the author’s first book, the presentation of self in everyday life. speaker stirred up our group so much, i just had to check out the book she cited, which was titled with the single word stigma. one of these speculations of mine pertains to the concept of "hipness," which seems in our society to depend on representing oneself as a true social deviant in goffman's sense, while nevertheless depending on certain "in-group outsider" identifications by others in order to consolidate the hip social role. as is often the case for me when reading sociology books, i was frequently irritated or critical of the way this author, like others in this field, makes sweeping generalizations about how people behave. having said that, i’m still curious about the author’s first book, the presentation of self in everyday life. am amazed about the simplicity of this book, which is not the same as saying the book is without context. one of the upshots of goffman's analysis here is to throw into relief the active social construction of stigma and the stigmatization of individuals who are known, or believed, to have one of the stigmatic social identities. this book, i'm reminded of being sat in the pub with three lecturers at my university when i was an undergraduate a year or two ago. goffman is writing on the very interesting subject of stigma, and while many of the points he makes are interesting and valid i was put off by his writing style and his frequent use of an 'us versus them' approach (for instance, he often referred to "we normals", which i found offensive). i found a lot of the things the book discusses really obvious, whether because the book was written long ago or because i have personally spent a lot of time in queer and/or disabled communities i cannot say. read this book because i'm starting a phd in sociology this fall and i'd read other goffman texts, and they had this book at borders, so i figured it was probably a big deal in sociology. "the most influential american sociologist of the twentieth century" (fine, manning, and smith 2000:ix), as a subjective analyst, goffman's greatest contribution to social theory is his study of symbolic interaction in the form of dramaturgical analysis that began with his 1959 book the present. the thing is, i may have gotten the wrong book on stigma because the book was not nearly as interesting as her speech. goffman begins by outlining the concept of virtual and actual social identity: virtual identity being that which is projected to other people in a social circumstance, actual being what the person actually is, or at least perceives themselves to be. goffman discusses how one manages stigma, through their social, personal, and ego identities. i consider this book of high value for feminist theory, as do most published feminists. another goodreads reviewer said, this book is academic jargon at its worst. so, of course, this quote goffman finds along the way from someone with a stigma stopped me.

Stigma: Notes on the Management of Spoiled Identity by Erving

however, the thoughts and theories put forward in this book are some of the best i have read regarding the situation of somebody who is stigmatised in society compared to somebody who adopts a non-stigmatised position. this reason - the easy-to-read rigorous exploding of the idea that stigmas really "mean" anything or have intrinsic value - the book is worth reading. a bit of a 'classic', this book published in the us in 1963, makes many interesting observations about the nature of stigma. however, the thoughts and theories put forward in this book are some of the best i have read regarding the situation of somebody who is stigmatised in society compared to somebody who adopts a non-stigmatised position. while i recognize that this book was written in the 1960s and that it was very progressive for the time, it still didn't do it for me. of writing is difficult to comprehend sometimes, but the book is very informative and worthwhile reading. a bit of a 'classic', this book published in the us in 1963, makes many interesting observations about the nature of stigma. this is such a good book and such a quick read – it is only about 140 pages. goffman breaks down the quotidian interactions between people who are trying to conceal, manage or control some aspect of their identity that discredits them. i consider this book of high value for feminist theory, as do most published feminists. what i'm writing here all sounds highly critical of the book, and i have to say i spent much of my time as i read in a state of actively disliking what i was reading on the page. am amazed about the simplicity of this book, which is not the same as saying the book is without context. it was then that i decided i really must read goffman, and luckily i was not let down. some of the language--for instance, using the word "normal" to describe non-stigmatized people (implying others are "not normal") sounds odd and--to use a word that wasn't available to goffman when he wrote--"ableist" today. in this final chapter, goffman speaks of the tendency among the stigmatized to apply what i would call a substance metaphysics to their own conception of their identities. what i'm writing here all sounds highly critical of the book, and i have to say i spent much of my time as i read in a state of actively disliking what i was reading on the page. the book helped me think about how people manage their stigma and their discreditable identities every day. goffman is more cited today from his books than during his time. extensively on autobiographies and case studies, sociologist erving goffman analyzes the stigmatized person’s feelings about himself and his relationship to “normals” he explores the variety of strategies stigmatized individuals employ to deal with the rejection of others, and the complex sorts of information about themselves they project. some of the language--for instance, using the word "normal" to describe non-stigmatized people (implying others are "not normal") sounds odd and--to use a word that wasn't available to goffman when he wrote--"ableist" today. this book you have to bear in mind the time it was written in, and ignore some of the language use, and assumptions made about readership. of the footnotes about homosexuality reference evelyn hooker (whose works could stand to be collected into a book - also, it seems that the documentary on her is not easily available, although there is a short video of her on youtube. this is noted by goffman (1963:141) in his discussion of leaders, who are subsequently given license to deviate from some behavioral norms, because they have contributed far above the expectations of the group. that may have been the accepted style of academics in 1963 when this book was published, but i much prefer today’s style in which academics like steven levitt and clinicians like oliver sacks, m. sections covered in the book are stigma and social identity, information control, group alignment and ego identity and the self and its other and deviations from the norm.

  • Stigma: Notes on the Management of Spoiled Identity - Erving

    a bit too intellectual for me overall but quite academically and well written book about the concepts of stigma. the book helped me think about how people manage their stigma and their discreditable identities every day. at that point, one of the lecturers broke in, "apart from goffman. book was terribly boring, but it had this one great example in it about how people treat someone when they just find out about their stigma. was also interested to see a reference to the book the little locksmith, which had recently been recommended. goffman's other areas of study included social order and interaction, impression management, total institutions, social organization of experience, and stigmas. book was terribly boring, but it had this one great example in it about how people treat someone when they just find out about their stigma. another goodreads reviewer said, this book is academic jargon at its worst. really, it is the sort of short book that should take an afternoon, well, or a life time. this book, i'm reminded of being sat in the pub with three lecturers at my university when i was an undergraduate a year or two ago. if it is the same book, then she took its lessons off in her own direction, and as i said, her way turned out better. helps you keep track of books you want to read. falk expounds upon goffman's work by redefining deviant as "others who deviate from the expectations of a group" and by categorizing deviance into two types:Societal deviance refers to a condition widely perceived, in advance and in general, as being deviant and hence stigma and stigmatized. if you read modern texts on similar subjects, goffman is cited everywhere! goffman illuminated how stigmatized people manage their "spoiled identity" (meaning the stigma disqualifies the stigmatized individual from full social acceptance) before audiences of normals. of the footnotes about homosexuality reference evelyn hooker (whose works could stand to be collected into a book - also, it seems that the documentary on her is not easily available, although there is a short video of her on youtube. by having people with stigma talking goffman seems to bring the definition of stigma into a daily basic understanding. read this book while i was preparing a paper for a conference. at that point, one of the lecturers broke in, "apart from goffman. "the most influential american sociologist of the twentieth century" (fine, manning, and smith 2000:ix), as a subjective analyst, goffman's greatest contribution to social theory is his study of symbolic interaction in the form of dramaturgical analysis that began with his 1959 book the presentation of self in everyday life. by exposing that stigmas are meaningless, goffman implies that perhaps stigmas should be removed. one of the upshots of goffman's analysis here is to throw into relief the active social construction of stigma and the stigmatization of individuals who are known, or believed, to have one of the stigmatic social identities. goffman's other areas of study included social order and interaction, impression management, total institutions, social organization of experience, and stigmas. as is often the case for me when reading sociology books, i was frequently irritated or critical of the way this author, like others in this field, makes sweeping generalizations about how people behave. was required to read this book for a graduate seminar on the metaphysics of social identities.
  • A Critical Review of Erving Goffman's Stigma Essay -- Papers

    coleman first adapted erving goffman's (1963) social stigma theory to gifted children, providing a rationale for why children may hide their abilities and present alternate identities to their peers. if it is the same book, then she took its lessons off in her own direction, and as i said, her way turned out better. over the last two decades, many studies have reported that african americans show higher global self-esteem than whites even though, as a group, african americans tend to receive poorer outcomes in many areas of life and experience significant discrimination and stigma. some of the language--for instance, using the word "normal" to describe non-stigmatized people (implying others are "not normal") sounds odd and--to use a word that wasn't available to goffman when he wrote--"ableist" today. by marking “stigma: notes on the management of spoiled identity” as want to read:Error rating book. basic distinction goffman makes towards understanding the literature on stigma (mostly qualitative) is that between virtual and social identity. by exposing that stigmas are meaningless, goffman implies that perhaps stigmas should be removed. conversation was centred on the reading of sociological books and the way in which each sociologist would have a different opinion, one loving a theorist and the other hating him thinking he was completely wrong. goffman gives the example that "some jobs in america cause holders without the expected college education to conceal this fact; other jobs, however, can lead to the few of their holders who have a higher education to keep this a secret, lest they be marked as failures and outsiders. In Stigma the interplay of alternatives the stigmatized individual must face every day is brilliantly examined by one of America’s leading social analysts. so, of course, this quote goffman finds along the way from someone with a stigma stopped me. some of the language--for instance, using the word "normal" to describe non-stigmatized people (implying others are "not normal") sounds odd and--to use a word that wasn't available to goffman when he wrote--"ableist" today. really, it could have fit in 1/4 of the pages he used, and it was a short book to begin with. erving goffman's theory of social stigma, a stigma is an attribute, behavior, or reputation which is socially discrediting in a particular way: it causes an individual to be mentally classified by others in an undesirable, rejected stereotype rather than in an accepted, normal one. the author of The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life, Stigma is analyzes a person’s feelings about himself and his relationship to people whom society calls “normal. "the most influential american sociologist of the twentieth century" (fine, manning, and smith 2000:ix), as a subjective analyst, goffman's greatest contribution to social theory is his study of symbolic interaction in the form of dramaturgical analysis that began with his 1959 book the presentation of self in everyday life. and cross were the first to identify intellectual giftedness as a stigmatizing condition and they created a model based on goffman's (1963) work, research with gifted students,[59] and a book that was written and edited by 20 teenage, gifted individuals. this book you have to bear in mind the time it was written in, and ignore some of the language use, and assumptions made about readership. for this reason, stigma is especially important for sociology, as the theory expounded by goffman is applicable to so many situations, across gender, ability, class and racialised identity. for this reason, stigma is especially important for sociology, as the theory expounded by goffman is applicable to so many situations, across gender, ability, class and racialised identity. drawing heavily from autobiographical and fictional accounts, this book really made me recognise a lot of social situations regarding the subject, both from the world of movies and novels, but also from everyday life. this book makes an interesting contrast with andrew solomon's "far from the tree," which deals with the same topic--how society treats people who belong to marginalized and stigmatized groups--but solomon builds his arguments by piling on one unique anecdote after another in a beautiful mosaic, a book that celebrates individuality rather than erasing it. basic distinction goffman makes towards understanding the literature on stigma (mostly qualitative) is that between virtual and social identity. goffman shies away from the term deviance somewhat, instead using stigma as a deeply discrediting feature in an individual that makes other “normal” people categorise the individual as such. nevertheless it covers a substantial range of the topic of stigma and explores the qualitative data collected by ervin goffman's extensive research.
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    • Forum Introduction: Reflections on the Fiftieth Anniversary of Erving

      "the most influential american sociologist of the twentieth century" (fine, manning, and smith 2000:ix), as a subjective analyst, goffman's greatest contribution to social theory is his study of symbolic interaction in the form of dramaturgical analysis that began with his 1959 book the present. really, it could have fit in 1/4 of the pages he used, and it was a short book to begin with. this book you have to bear in mind the time it was written in, and ignore some of the language use, and assumptions made about readership. goffman was also named the 73rd president of the american sociological association. this is the book where goffman came up with the idea of ‘passing’, i believe. the book is an easy read but it strikes me as very dated in places and nothing in it jumped out at me on an initial reflection as a revelation. goffman shies away from the term deviance somewhat, instead using stigma as a deeply discrediting feature in an individual that makes other “normal” people categorise the individual as such. read it at the prompting of covering, the hidden assault on our civil rights, the author of which got the concept of covering (not being totally closeted, but downplaying aspects of one's identity when one is part of a stigmatized group) from this book. read this book because i'm starting a phd in sociology this fall and i'd read other goffman texts, and they had this book at borders, so i figured it was probably a big deal in sociology. the actual correspondence of the virtual identity one reads off of a person's bodily presence in a certain social context, to that person's larger social identity, is necessary to what goffman calls discrediting. the book is talking largely about males, yet this was a book of its time and the theories held within are still applicable to gendered situations. of the footnotes about homosexuality reference evelyn hooker (whose works could stand to be collected into a book - also, it seems that the documentary on her is not easily available, although there is a short video of her on youtube. overall, i think goffman uses way too many words to explain his concepts, and the concepts themselves are poorly organized. the book is an easy read but it strikes me as very dated in places and nothing in it jumped out at me on an initial reflection as a revelation. as is often the case for me when reading sociology books, i was frequently irritated or critical of the way this author, like others in this field, makes sweeping generalizations about how people behave. a bit too intellectual for me overall but quite academically and well written book about the concepts of stigma. read it at the prompting of covering, the hidden assault on our civil rights, the author of which got the concept of covering (not being totally closeted, but downplaying aspects of one's identity when one is part of a stigmatized group) from this book. this reason - the easy-to-read rigorous exploding of the idea that stigmas really "mean" anything or have intrinsic value - the book is worth reading. read it at the prompting of covering, the hidden assault on our civil rights, the author of which got the concept of covering (not being totally closeted, but downplaying aspects of one's identity when one is part of a stigmatized group) from this book. goffman begins by outlining the concept of virtual and actual social identity: virtual identity being that which is projected to other people in a social circumstance, actual being what the person actually is, or at least perceives themselves to be. read this book because i'm starting a phd in sociology this fall and i'd read other goffman texts, and they had this book at borders, so i figured it was probably a big deal in sociology. book was terribly boring, but it had this one great example in it about how people treat someone when they just find out about their stigma. basic distinction goffman makes towards understanding the literature on stigma (mostly qualitative) is that between virtual and social identity.., frame analysis) it becomes clear that goffman's own descriptive project as outlined in the essay is entangled in the interest-bound attempt to discover the truth as any stigmatized individual seeking a coherent picture of herself and the world. the strategies invented or adopted by the stigmatized for achieving a coherent picture of their role in society, also known as worldviews or life-philosophies, are no more than worldviews according to goffman's account.
    • The Trials of Alice Goffman - The New York Times

      of the footnotes about homosexuality reference evelyn hooker (whose works could stand to be collected into a book - also, it seems that the documentary on her is not easily available, although there is a short video of her on youtube. really, it could have fit in 1/4 of the pages he used, and it was a short book to begin with. the dynamics of 'covering' a flaw, or trying to 'pass' as a 'normal' are explored and this fairly shortish book builds to quite a complete perspective upon the 'norms' of society and the way in-group and out-group stigmatised individuals exist in a kind of symbiosis (my word), with the ideals of identity - everyone alway existing at some point in both groups. a further sense in which stigma is relational is that which goffman elaborates in his last chapter here. 2007 goffman was listed as the 6th most-cited intellectual in the humanities and social sciences by the times higher education guide, behind anthony giddens and ahead of jürgen habermas. (1984) added the "six dimensions" and correlate them to goffman's two types of stigma, discredited and discreditable. at that point, one of the lecturers broke in, "apart from goffman. the book was brief, which was nice for being one of several required books for one class. drawing heavily from autobiographical and fictional accounts, this book really made me recognise a lot of social situations regarding the subject, both from the world of movies and novels, but also. it can also be a characteristic such as being homosexual – much more in goffman’s time or in russia or uganda today say. am not entirely clear whether political correctness has radically altered the discourse in many (but not all) of these categories, or whether even at the time goffman was being provocative and rebellious (i suspect he was). it was then that i decided i really must read goffman, and luckily i was not let down. speaker stirred up our group so much, i just had to check out the book she cited, which was titled with the single word stigma. this book you have to bear in mind the time it was written in, and ignore some of the language use, and assumptions made about readership. as is often the case for me when reading sociology books, i was frequently irritated or critical of the way this author, like others in this field, makes sweeping generalizations about how people behave. am not entirely clear whether political correctness has radically altered the discourse in many (but not all) of these categories, or whether even at the time goffman was being provocative and rebellious (i suspect he was). the book is talking largely about males, yet this was a book of its time and the theories held within are still applicable to gendered situations. could not review this book as a sociologist and not mention the lack of gender equality in this book, but at the time it was written, the accepted mode of academic writing even within sociology was to refer to "he" when speaking of a person. stigma (1963), erving goffman discusses the effects of stigma, "the situation of the individual who is disqualified from full social inclusion" (preface), something that makes others believe they are "not quite human" (5). conversation was centred on the reading of sociological books and the way in which each sociologist would have a different opinion, one loving a theorist and the other hating him thinking he was completely wrong. goffman was one of the most influential sociologists of the twentieth century. goffman's 1963 work made this aspect of stigma prominent and it has remained so ever since. i found a lot of the things the book discusses really obvious, whether because the book was written long ago or because i have personally spent a lot of time in queer and/or disabled communities i cannot say. read it at the prompting of covering, the hidden assault on our civil rights, the author of which got the concept of covering (not being totally closeted, but downplaying aspects of one's identity when one is part of a stigmatized group) from this book. the book was brief, which was nice for being one of several required books for one class.

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